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Brown Adipose Tissue Activity in Response to Semaglutide Administered to Obese Subjects.

About

Brief Summary

ABSTRACT Glucagon like peptide (GLP-1) agonists, such as liraglutide, exenatide, and semaglutide, have been increasingly used as a medication to address the current twin epidemics of diabetes and obesity. Their activities include increasing insulin production by pancreatic beta cells, improving insulin sensitivity in muscles and weight loss1,2. The mechanisms underpinning the weight loss caused by GLP-1 agonists have not yet been fully elucidated, but brown adipose tissue (BAT) appears to play an important role1,2.

We propose to assess BAT activity, using infrared thermography camera images, before individuals start weekly administration of semaglutide, at week 2-4, and week 18-20. We hypothesize that this GLP-1 agonist, semaglutide, will cause an increase in BAT activity and a corresponding increase in basal metabolic rate.

Study Type
Observational

Eligibility

Gender
Male
Healthy Volunteers
No
Minimum Age
18 Years
Maximum Age
N/A

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients scheduled to start semaglutide for weight loss
  • 18 years of age and willing to participate

  • Male or post-menopausal females

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of prior neck surgery and /or neck irradiation
    • Use of beta blocker agents
    • Use of any other glucose lowering medication
    • History of neuropathic disorders (e.g. diabetic neuropathy)
    • Diabetic patients
    • Individuals without normal thyroid function
    • Individuals with cancer
    • Any significant chronic disease or renal, hepatic or endocrine disease
    • Current smokers
    • Inability of patient to provide consent either for medical reasons or psychiatric reasons

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Study Stats
Protocol No.
22-000718
Category
Epidemiology
Contact
Julie Sorg
Location
  • UCLA Westwood
For Providers
NCT No.
NCT05419726
For detailed technical eligibility, visit ClinicalTrials.gov.