Statement on Pharmaceutical Technology compounding pharmacy

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and other hospitals are subject to inspections by multiple federal, state and local regulatory agencies, and it is common for inspectors to recommend areas for improvement. UCLA Health has comprehensive and rigorous quality-assurance programs reflecting our highest priority – the well-being of our patients – and the objective input of regulators is an essential tool in our efforts to continually enhance our practices.

In October 2016, UCLA Health voluntarily closed one off-campus compounding pharmacy following an annual site visit by the state Board of Pharmacy. It was a business decision that does not affect UCLA Health’s other pharmacies or ability to provide exceptional patient care. UCLA Health is committed to compliance with pharmacy board regulations designed to ensure high-quality care.

The primary role of the offsite compounding facility, Pharmaceutical Technology, was to compound nonsterile-to-sterile medications.

Like many medical centers, UCLA Health now no longer compounds such medications. UCLA Health still compounds sterile-to-sterile medications and nonsterile medications onsite at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.

At the time of the Board of Pharmacy inspection, UCLA had already begun to use other suppliers for the nonsterile-to-sterile compounding products produced by the pharmacy, with the goal being to stop producing all such compounds. There were no allegations or findings that outdated ingredients were administered to patients. No adulterated ingredients were identified.

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Questions and Answers:

The primary role of the offsite compounding facility, Pharmaceutical Technology, was to compound nonsterile-to-sterile medications. Like many medical centers, UCLA Health now no longer compounds such medications. UCLA Health still compounds sterile-to-sterile medications and nonsterile medications onsite at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.

Why did UCLA close the offsite compounding pharmacy? Was it because of the inspection?
UCLA closed the pharmacy because it was providing services that were redundant to services available elsewhere. UCLA had already begun to use other suppliers for the nonsterile-to-sterile compounding products produced by the pharmacy, with the goal being to use other suppliers for all such compounds. The decision to close the pharmacy was a business decision that does not affect UCLA Health’s other pharmacies or ability to provide exceptional patient care.

Were any outdated or adulterated ingredients administered to patients? If so, what?
There were no allegations or findings that outdated ingredients were administered to patients. The outdated compound identified by the Board of Pharmacy was never intended for use, because we were no longer compounding that product and had found other suppliers. No adulterated ingredients were identified.

Was there any risk to patients? Why not?
Neither the board nor UCLA identified outdated or adulterated ingredients administered to patients.

Did the Board of Pharmacy recommend a recall?
The Board of Pharmacy never recommended a recall.

Did UCLA notify the Food and Drug Administration or other public agencies or regulators about the BOP’s findings related to the pharmacy?
No. If the Board of Pharmacy had deemed it necessary based on its findings, it could have called in other regulatory agencies as it deemed appropriate. These agencies can include, but are not limited to, the Food and Drug Administration.

What did UCLA do with the outdated medications that inspectors found at the pharmacy?
It is our policy throughout the health system to remove and destroy any outdated ingredients. That is what we did in this case. The Board of Pharmacy received documentation that all outdated ingredients had been removed from the compounding site.

What became of the work that was being done at the compounding pharmacy? Who is doing it now, and where?
The products are now purchased from outside suppliers.