Esophageal Diseases

Esophagus in 3D x-ray of human body

Esophageal cancer is an aggressive and deadly form of cancer. There are two major subtypes: esophageal adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In the United States, the epidemiology of these two subtypes is evolving, and the May Lab studies them separately as they have many distinct risk factors.

Our team uses national data and cancer registry data to study national trends in esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and disease stage at presentation in the United States.

ACG Presentation

Our team also examines national racial and ethnic disparities in esophageal cancer incidence and outcomes to better understand how all individuals, regardless of background, can have the best possible outcomes after a diagnosis of esophageal cancer.

Future studies will aim to understand how to improve the care and well-being of patients with a diagnosis of esophageal cancer at UCLA Health. We are also interested in finding ways to improve the delivery of healthcare to patients with this disease in the greater Los Angeles area.


Collaborations

  • Kevin Ghassemi, MD, Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
  • Jeffrey L. Conklin, MD, Professor of Clinical Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
  • V. Raman Muthusamy, MD, MAS, Professor of Clinical Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
     

Grants

  1. Corona E, Yang L, Esrailian E, May FP. Trends In Esophageal Adenocarcinoma And Squamous Cell Carcinoma Mortality And Stage At Diagnosis By Race And Ethnicity In The United States [Oral presentation at Digestive Diseases Week; 2019 May 18–21; San Diego, CA].