Frequently Asked Questions

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We offer comprehensive eating disorder treatment programs. To learn more about our services, call 310-825-2631.

What kinds of eating disorders, and what age range of patients, do you treat?

How many patients are in your program?

Do patients in the eating disorders program interact with general psychiatry patients?

What is the typical length of stay in treatment?

How often do patients have individual therapy?

How often do patients see a psychiatrist?

Is exercise part of your treatment program?

What about school for minor patients?

Will parents of patients have someone to talk with on a regular basis?

How often are visits and phone calls with family and friends permitted?

What kind of clothes should I bring to the hospital?

What should I bring besides my clothes?

Do I need to bring money with me?

Who are the professional staff?

What is the cost of treatment?

How is admission arranged?


What kinds of eating disorders, and what age range of patients, do you treat?

Our inpatient hospitalization program treats children and adolescents under the age of 18 with eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia, avoidant restrictive intake disorder and other non-specific eating disorders that lead to extreme weight loss.

How many patients are in your program?

There are typically 7 patients for our Eating Disorders Program and at times 8 patients.

Do patients in the eating disorders program interact with general psychiatry patients?

Although some programming is combined, most program groups are separate.

What is the typical length of stay in treatment?

Length of stay in inpatient hospitalization is determined by an individual patient’s needs, taking into account the nature and extent of the difficulties the individual is experiencing. Thus, length of time in treatment will vary and there is no “typical” length of stay. Some of our patients stay for several weeks, others for several months or longer.

How often do patients have individual therapy?

All patients receive individual sessions as determined between patient and treatment team.

How often do patients see a psychiatrist?

Patients meet with a psychiatrist more than once a week and meet with the program director regularly.

Is exercise part of your treatment program?

Yes. Patients begin engaging in a moderate level of supervised physical activity once they have reached a weight at which exercise is appropriate. For patients with a history of excessive or compulsive exercise, emphasis is placed on helping the individual develop and practice a flexible program of moderate exercise.

What about school for minor patients?

The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) Carlson Hospital School provides instructional services for children and adolescents on the UCLA RNPH inpatient unit. Once patients are enrolled in the Carlson School program, instruction is approximately 2 hours per day Monday-Friday during the school year and follows the LAUSD calendar. With parental consent, communication with a patient's public or private school can be made in order to maximize continuity with assignments during the admission. There is a UCLA RNPH Education Consultant also available to discuss educational issues as indicated.

Will parents of patients have someone to talk with on a regular basis?

Yes. The case coordinator and/or the social worker maintain regular contact with parents of our adolescent patients. Family therapy sessions are typically held once a week for our adolescent patients, and parents are encouraged to attend the weekly parent support group led by our inpatient nursing staff.

How often are visits and phone calls with family and friends permitted?

For the adolescent inpatient program, visiting hours are seven days a week from 6-7PM. On weekends and holidays visiting hours are from 2-4PM and 6-7PM. There is a pay phone that can be used to make or receive calls during free time up until 10 p.m. for adolescents. Phone calls are usually limited to 10 minutes each, so that everyone has a chance to use the phone. The phone may not be used during scheduled activities.

What kind of clothes should I bring to the hospital?

We recommend bringing washable, easy-care clothing, clearly marked with one’s name, enough for 3-5 days. Laundry facilities are on the inpatient unit, and laundry detergent will be supplied for you. Suggested items to bring include:

  • 1 pair slip-on athletic shoes (no laces)
  • 1 pair slippers
  • 7 pairs of socks
  • 7 pairs of underwear
  • 3 pairs of pants that may include jeans, sweatpants or capris (no leggings/ no tights)
  • 3 pairs of long sleeve shirts and 3 pairs of short-sleeve shirts
  • 3 bras such as sport bras (no under wire)
  • 2 sweaters (no sweatshirts with hoods or strings)
  • NO metal or strings.

Please note that belongings list is subject to change, please do inquire with the eating disorders admissions coordinator for the most up-to-date list.

What should I bring besides my clothes?

You are welcome to bring other items that may help you feel more comfortable during your stay, such as your own pictures (no metal nor glass frames), and books. Toiletries such as body wash, shampoo and conditioner sealed (no alcohol in active ingredient list). Hair brush (not metal) and toothbrush (not battery operated and no metal). Eye glasses, retainer, plastic watch, contacts and solution. Please note that belongings list is subject to change, please do inquire with the eating disorders admissions coordinator for the most up-to-date list.

Do I need to bring money with me?

The treatment team may plan for you to go off unit to practice meals and snacks. You may bring up to $20 to be kept locked up with your belongings in your room. Please inquire with eating disorders admissions coordinator for updates.

Who are the professional staff?

Our multidisciplinary treatment team is comprised of licensed clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, clinical social workers, occupational therapists, recreation therapists and psychiatric nurses – all with extensive experience in the care of patients with eating disorders and their families. All treatment is under the general oversight of Michael Strober, Ph.D.

What is the cost of treatment?

The cost of inpatient hospitalization depends upon your insurance benefits. We will verify your insurance benefits and discuss specific costs with you prior to admission.

How is admission arranged?

For admission to the Adolescent Inpatient Eating Disorders program, please contact our Eating Disorders Admissions Coordinator Brandy Saccacio at 310-948-8170, [email protected].