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Many IBD patients skipped or reduced medication doses during the COVID-19 pandemic (2021)
Everyday Health interviewed Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of IBD clinical research for the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Christina Gentile, PsyD, MA, ABPP, clinical health psychologist for the Integrative Digestive Health and Wellness Program, on decreased clinical visits and check-ups during the pandemic.


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, special editor for Gastroenterology Clinics (2021)
Dr. Limketkai, director of clinical research for the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was a guest editor for the special Gastroenterology Clinics issue on "Nutritional Management of Gastrointestinal Diseases." Read the full text


Is your ulcerative colitis-related stress under control? Take this assessment (2021)
Christina T. Gentile, PsyD, ABPP, GI health psychologist, and Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of clinical research for the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, are quoted in this EveryDay Health article on how anxiety and stress can trigger – or aggravate – inflammation and colitis, and vice versa. You can take an assessment to find out if there’s more you could be doing to manage stress – and what you can do to improve your quality of life.


How the Western diet is wreaking havoc on our gut (2021)
Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of IBD clinical research for the UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was quoted by Medium on the likelihood of toxins, pollutants or pesticides causing a rise in inflammation and IBD.


What you need to know about ulcerative colitis (2021)
Nimah Ather, MD, gastroenterologist at UCLA Health Torrance, was interviewed by The Healthy on treatment for ulcerative colitis.


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, Appointed Contributing Editor of the Journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice (2021)
Dr. Limketkai, director of clinical research, UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was recently appointed contributing editor of the journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice, one of the two flagship journals of ASPEN (American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition). His primary role is overseeing the review and publication of high-impact nutrition articles written by physician members of the ASPEN and their multi-disciplinary collaborators.


Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation funds first studies on brain-gut-microbiome signatures of stress-related IBD symptom flares (2020)
Emeran A. Mayer, MD, director of the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, was invited to be part of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation’s Challenges in IBD 2018 Initiative, which has focused on the role of environmental triggers in IBD pathophysiology. This initiative has identified factors believed to play a role in IBD, such as diet, psychological stress, viruses and smoking. Together with Jenny Sauk, MD, medical director of the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Jonathan P. Jacobs, MD, PhD, director of the Microbiome Core in the UCLA Microbiome Center, he received funding for one of the first studies resulting from this initiative, Brain-Gut-Microbiome Signatures of Stress-Related IBD Symptom Flares. The purpose of this longitudinal study is to identify biomarkers within the brain-gut microbiome axis that characterize a subset of IBD patients at higher risk for stress-related IBD flares. Early data provides compelling evidence of the relationship between higher stress perception and frequency of flares, as well as a measurable indicator of that subset of patients.


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, awarded funding by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation to launch clinical trial
In a collaboration between the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Center for Human Nutrition, Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of clinical research for the Center for IBD, and Zhaoping Li, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Clinical Nutrition, were recently awarded major funding by the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation to launch a clinical trial on the use of a UCLA-designed anti-inflammatory diet for the treatment of Crohn's disease. The multi-year study will also investigate the impact of diet on the innate immune profile, gut microbiome, bacterial metabolome, and microRNA signature of host-bacteria communication. Key UCLA investigators from the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases include Harry Pothoulakis, MD, Jill Hoffman, PhD, Jonathan P. Jacobs, MD, PhD, and Jenny Sauk, MD.


6 things for IBD patients to keep in mind when it comes to medication, infusions, procedures and more
Inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, is an umbrella term for two conditions that cause chronic inflammation of the digestive tract: Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Because IBD patients are often on an immune-suppressing medication to keep their disease in remission, many want to know if they are at increased risk for contracting SARS-CoV2 -- the virus that causes COVID-19 – or of having a severe course of the coronavirus disease. Article available on UCLA Health Connect blog


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, chosen as 2020-2021 UCLA biodesign fellow
The UCLA Biodesign Program has announced an accelerator track for entrepreneurs seeking advanced training in health care technology innovation. The program strives to provide participants with a stepwise process for identifying, assessing and de-risking meaningful health care technology opportunities and accelerate the development timeline. The cornerstone of the accelerator track is a series of monthly workshops with peers and industry mentors across the medical technology ecosystem. Topics will span the lifecycle of product development, from concept to commercialization. Dr. Limketkai, director of clinical research for the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was one of 10 UCLA physicians to participate in this year-long program.


Ulcerative colitis may be linked to missing gut microbe
Emeran A. Mayer, MD, director of the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, was quoted in a Healthline article about a study finding that ulcerative colitis may be tied to a missing gut microbe.


If you really want to optimize your diet, focus on fiber
Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of clinical research for the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was quoted in an Elemental article about the importance of including fiber in your diet.


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, auoted on low-FODMAP diet
Dr. Limketkai, director of clinical research for the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was quoted in JAMA stating, “Unfortunately, there is a lot of misinformation about what the FODMAP diet entails and how to implement it, even among gastroenterologists. A dietitian’s assistance is key for patients to precisely follow a low-FODMAP diet in its original intent.”


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, quoted in Time Health, Fall 2019
The lead article for the Fall 2019 issue of Time Health asked, “Are our guts getting worse?” There are many evidence-backed theories for why IBD is on the rise, but the broad adoption of the Western diet – replete with heavily processed, additive-laden and sugary foods – is one of the likeliest drivers, says Dr. Limketkai, director of clinical research for the UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. “The standard American diet has a high inflammation profile, and we know it causes or contributes to a range of conditions, including obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome.


Levels of vitamin D are low after Crohn's disease is established not before - October 2019
Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of clinical research, Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, published a recent article, “Levels of Vitamin D are Low After Crohn's Disease is Established But Not Before,” that  documents the largest study to directly measure vitamin D levels before and after diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Contrary to popular belief, low vitamin D levels were not associated with Crohn's disease before diagnosis, but were associated with Crohn's disease after diagnosis


The rewards and risks of probiotics - Summer 2019
Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, director of clinical research, Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Emeran A. Mayer, MD, director, G. Oppenheimer Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases were quoted in an article on The Rewards and Risks of Probiotics. The article ran in the Summer 2019 issue of Time Health.


UCLA docs take first step toward a chatbot for managing IBD - July 2019
Aria Zand, MD, under the supervision of Jenny Sauk, MD, clinical director of the UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, was able to use natural-language processing (NLP) to successfully categorize large amounts of electronic messaging data from IBD patients and their providers. By collecting this data and using algorithms to categorize messaging in a reasonable number of categories, they demonstrated the feasibility of NLP in categorizing messaging data for potential use in a chatbot.<


Berkeley Limketkai, MD, PhD, joins UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - April 2019
Dr. Limketkai earned his medical degree at the University of Cincinnati, where he was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha honor society. He subsequently completed his internal medicine residency, gastroenterology fellowship, and PhD education at Johns Hopkins University. Given his primary clinical and research interests in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and nutrition, Dr. Limketkai pursued advanced training as the Theodore M. Bayless Fellow in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at Johns Hopkins University and clinical nutrition training through the Nestlé Nutrition Institute. His doctoral dissertation explored the role of vitamin D in IBD pathogenesis and severity.

Prior to joining UCLA, Dr. Limketkai served on the clinical faculty at Stanford University and as IBD physician lead at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. He also spearheaded the Gastrointestinal Nutrition Program and initiated the Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) Program at Stanford.

At UCLA, Dr. Limketkai and colleagues are working to further the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases' outstanding patient care, high impact research and education. Their philosophy of care centers around the uniqueness of each IBD patient, addressing their multi-disciplinary and personalized needs.

As director of IBD clinical research, Dr. Limketkai strongly believes in exploiting the synergy between clinical care and research. He is keenly interested in studying microbiome manipulation as clinical therapy, including the use of prebiotics, probiotics and dietary interventions.

Dr. Limketkai's other research arm involves large data analyses of clinical outcomes and health services utilization. The primary goal of this endeavor is to better understand the factors that drive favorable or unfavorable outcomes in IBD. Through our multi-institution collaboration, he hopes to generate data that will help shape and improve the future care of IBD patients. Read more


IBD research expands to include brain-gut microbiome - June 2018
The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Inc. awarded Emeran A. Mayer, MD, director of the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience (CNSR), a three-year grant, with an annual budget of $300,000, to study "brain-gut-microbiome signatures of stress-related IBD symptom flares."" This is the first collaborative effort between Jonathan Jacobs, MD, PhD, Jenny Sauk, MD and CNSR focusing on IBD patients.


Your guide to tracking Crohn's symptoms - February 2018
Jenny Sauk, MD, health sciences assistant clinical professor of medicine in the Vatche and Tamar Manoukian Division of Digestive Diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, was featured Feb. 6 in an Everyday Health article on how to be aware of Crohn's disease symptoms early and often.


$4 million gift from The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation benefits research in stem cell science and digestive diseases - May 2014
Yahoo! News, Westside Today, News-Medical, Century City/Westwood Patch, Examiner, Digital Journal, Stem Cell News, City News Service, WN News.comHealth Medicine Network, Pluripotent: Stem Cell News, and websites for FOX-TV (Greenville, N.C.),WVNS-TV (Ghent, Va.), WAND-TV (Decatur, Ill.), KWTV-TV (Oklahoma City, Okla.), WGFL-TV (Gainesville, Fla.), WFSB-TV (Hartford, Conn.), KVVU-TV (Las Vegas, Nev.), WFLX-TV (West Palm Beach, Fla.), KFDA-TV (Amarillo, Texas), KQCW-TV (Tulsa, Okla.), WAVE-TV (Louisville, Ky.) and others May 8, Bioresearch Online May 13 and Canyon News May 15 covered two gifts from The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation to UCLA totaling $4 million that will fund UCLA research. The gifts will benefit the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA and the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at UCLA's Division of Digestive Diseases. Dr. Owen Witte, director of the Broad Stem Cell Research Center and Dr. Gary Gitnick, professor and co-chief of the Division of Digestive Diseases, and the Fran and Ray Stark Foundation Chair at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, were quoted.