Top structural biologists to discuss cryo-electron micoscopy at UCLA symposium

Media Contact

Mike Rodewald
WHAT:
The two-day Advanced Electron Microscopy in NanoMedicine Symposium at the California NanoSystems (CNSI) at UCLA brings together researchers from academia and industry to discuss cryo-electron microscopy, or cryoEM, an important new imaging tool with major applications for nanobiology and nanomedicine, particularly for understanding viruses and other macromolecular complexes. Researchers can use cryoEM to visualize a broad range of assemblies and nanometer-scale structures in three dimensions — from molecular to atomic resolution.
 
Organized by the Electron Imaging Center for Nanomachines (EICN), a newly established CNSI core lab, the symposium will also serve as a venue for the public unveiling of the top-of-the-line Titan Krios cryoEM and Titan (S)TEM microscopes in the EICN lab. These multimillion-dollar transmission electron microscopes from the FEI Co. have already produced some of the highest-resolution images yet of nanoscale devices and viruses.
 
WHO:
Conference speakers and participants will include representatives from:
 
  • UCLA
  • Scripps Research Institute
  • Baylor College of Medicine
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UC Berkeley
  • University of Virginia
  • Columbia University
  • University of Colorado at Boulder
  • California Institute of Technology
  • Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany)
  • École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)
  • National University of Singapore
  • Osaka University (Japan)
  • FEI Co.
  • National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
  • Florida State University
 
For a complete list of speakers, visit www.cnsi.ucla.edu/electron-microscopy/speakers.
 
WHEN:
Friday, Oct. 2—Saturday, Oct. 3
 
WHERE:
California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA, Building 114 (map)
 
INFORMATION | REGISTRATION:
For more information and to register for the event, visit www.cnsi.ucla.edu/cryoEM.
 
BACKGROUND:
Part of the difficulty of creating cures against virus infections is that their assembly mechanism and molecular interactions are poorly understood without atomic resolution structures. The cryoEm technique, by providing valuable structural information for research in cell biology, microbiology, molecular and biomolecular science, medicine, pharmaceuticals, and materials science, is bridging that knowledge gap and could help lead to major advances in structure-based rational drug design, targeted delivery and biology-inspired nanomachines.
 
MEDIA CONTACTS:
Mike Rodewald | 310-267-5883 | [email protected]
Jennifer Marcus | 310-267-4839 | [email protected]
 
PARKING:
Parking will be available in Lot 9 on Westwood Plaza. Press should contact media contact for parking reservations.
 
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Media Contact:
Mike Rodewald