Media Highlights 2012

UCLA gastroenterology ranked among the top 10 in the nation, according to a U.S.News & World Report survey that reviewed patient-outcomes data, reputation among physicians and other care-related factors. 

Once again, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center was rated the best hospital in the western United States for the 23rd consecutive year and the No. 1 hospital in the Los Angeles metropolitan area and the state of California. 


Devices on the iPad can improve care
Southern California Physician magazine ran a story in their November 2012 issue on Telemedicine Redefined. Dr. Daniel Hommes, a professor of Medicine at UCLA, said, "Devices as the iPad can improve care while saving costs in the health care landscape of the future." 


Ways to help alleviate nighttime GERD
Dr. V. Raman Muthusamy, associate clinical professor of medicine, director of interventional endoscopy, and endoscopy director of the UCLA Center for Esophageal Disorders, commented in the November issue of Vegetarian Times about ways to alleviate nighttime GERD, including using wedge pillows that raise the head and upper torso to help keep the acid down.


UCLA in your back pocket
eWeek ran a story on Sept. 21 about iPad Use at UCLA Helps Patients Manage Chronic Intestinal Ailments. Dr. Daniel Hommes, a professor of Medicine at UCLA, told eWeek, "The idea is to have UCLA in your back pocket."


Trades explore iPad use in patient care
Mobile Health News and Fierce Mobile Healthcare reported Sept. 18 that  patients, doctors and specialized nurses at UCLA are all using Apple iPads to help track inflammatory bowel patients' symptoms and care and to communicate with each other in real-time about disease management. Dr. Daniel Hommes, professor of medicine and director of the UCLA Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases was quoted. 


The gut and its bacteria a growing focus of research
Dr. Emeran A. Mayer, professor of medicine, physiology and psychiatry, commented Sept. 13 in a Los Angeles Times article about research into the role of gut microbes in promoting health and treating disease -- even with the brain.


Nighttime heartburn
Dr. Kevin Ghassemi, clinical program director for the UCLA Center for Esophageal Disorders, commented Aug 16. on the website TakePart about ways to lessen night time heartburn. 


Milk thistle does not affect liver enzymes or viralload in patients with hepatitis C
Dr. Sammy Saab, associate professor of medicine and surgery, was quoted July 19 by Medscape about a clinical trial showing that milk thistle does not affect liver enzymes or viral load in patients with hepatitis C.


Websites cover tips to reduce acid reflux
Stone Hearth News reported July 16; Examiner, Daily News, NewsBlaze, Business Life and News Medical reported July 17 on tips from UCLA's Center for Esophageal Disorders to help reduce risks associated with acid reflux disease. An upcoming seminar by UCLA experts on treatments for heartburn, GERD and Barrett's Esophagus was also highlighted. Dr. V. Raman Muthusamy, associate clinical professor of medicine, director of interventional endoscopy, and endoscopy director of the UCLA Center for Esophageal Disorders, and Dr. Kevin Ghassemi, clinical programs director of the UCLA Center for Esophageal Diseases, were quoted.


Alleviating heartburn
Dr. Bennett Roth, clinical professor of medicine, division of digestive diseases, and medical director for the UCLA Center for Esophageal Disorders, commented in July's Family Circle about alleviating heartburn. 


Confusion at the yogurt aisle? Time for probiotics 101
Kirsten Tillisch, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, division of digestive diseases and a researcher with the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress, was interviewed by Allison Aubrey of NPR - July 9, 2012. Researchers are studying the ability of beneficial micro-organisms - or probiotics - to treat a range of conditions from eczema to inflammatory bowel disease. And the idea that "good" bacteria are healthy for us is gaining traction. Full broadcast > 


Doc warned others of shooter's behavior
An article in the May 8 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about the suspect in a mass shooting at a Pittsburgh psychiatric institute cited Dr. Brennan Spiegel, assistant professor-in-residence of digestive diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, who warned colleagues about the suspect's behavior before the incident.


New drug treatment helps eradicate hepatitis C
Dr. Sammy Saab, associate professor of medicine and surgery, commented March 2 in a KCBS-Channel 2/KCAL-Channel 9 story about a new drug that helps eradicate hepatitis C. The report aired on CBS affiliates across the country. 


Proof at last? Colonoscopy and cancer prevention
Dr. Eric Esrailian, assistant clinical professor and vice-chair of digestive diseases, commented Feb. 23 in ABC News on a new study suggesting that removing non-cancerous polyps greatly reduces future risk of death from colorectal cancer.  The story was picked up by the Wall Street Journal and KABC-Channel 7.


Publication lauds super UCLA physicians
More than 250 UCLA physicians were rated among the top doctors in Los Angeles in the recently released 2102 Super Doctors publication, which recognizes doctors who have excelled professionally and are recognized as leaders within their fields of practice. The following digestive disease faculty were recognized: Dr. Peter Anton, Dr. Daniel Cole, Dr. Francisco Durazo, Dr. Steven-Huy Han, Dr. Dennis Jensen, Dr. Rome Jutabha, Dr. Bennett Roth, Dr. Thomas Kovacs, Dr. Sammy Saab, Dr. Brennan Spiegel, Dr. Wilfred Weinstein. 


The real butterfly in your stomach - Scietists Explore the possibility of a "second brain" in our gut
Dr. Emeran A. Mayer, professor of medicine, physiology and psychiatry and director of the G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, commented Jan. 17 in a Daily Free Press article about the gut's enteric nervous system, which acts like a second brain.