Resident Spotlight

Resident Spotlight

Ellen Campbell

Elle Campbell, MD

What made you want to train at UCLA?
UCLA's program has so much to offer, such as opportunities to work with and teach medical students, numerous opportunities for resident involvement within the program, strong clinical experiences, great mentorship, and many research opportunities in a variety of specialties. More than anything, the number of diverse clinical training sites was a big appeal (and well worth the driving time!). We get strong training in all different clinical settings, including "bread-and-butter" pediatrics, care of very medically complex patients, underserved public hospital experiences, and opportunities to see rare "zebra" cases. But, the most important factor was the people here. Everyone here supports each other, and every faculty member I've met so far has been a strong advocate for resident education.

What part of your training has been the most meaningful, so far?
I have learned SO much from all of my Senior Residents! I love how much we get to know each of the seniors. There are many rotations where only one or two interns are paired with a senior, and these are some of the best opportunities to learn, receive mentoring, and get feedback and guidance tailored to us. All of the senior residents have been amazing!

What projects are you working on?
So far, I've been focusing on being an intern, but I want to get involved with clinical research and also our Residency Advocacy Council!

What are your plans after residency?
I definitely plan to do a fellowship, but my specific plans are still evolving (check back in a year or two for the final answer)! I've loved all of my rotations so far, and I always find myself considering a new specialty when I get to experience it.

When I’m not in the hospital you can find me…
On one of the amazing beaches on the westside of LA or out exploring new cuisine and restaurants in our area.

Ellie Conser

Ellie Conser, MD

Why did you want to train at UCLA? 
I was the most energized after my UCLA interview day, and again after I did my Second Look. The people, teaching, and culture at UCLA really drew me to the program. The residents, fellows, and attendings were all very friendly, welcoming, and fun in addition to being brilliant and awesome teachers. Plus the food on interview day was great and I love being well fed :) I knew UCLA was a place I could get top notch training, enjoy my colleagues day to day, and get to enjoy the great city of Los Angeles!

What part of training has been the most meaningful, so far?
All of the day to day small moments - connecting with patients and families, the funny moments where kids really do say the darndest things! These moments remind me of why I chose Pediatrics and are a testament to the joy that this field brings me.

What projects are you working on? Or what special interests do you have?
Right now I am working on a project to create a pathway for Hyperbilirubinemia management. I am also part of the Pediatrics Interest Group and mentor medical students interested in pursuing Pediatrics.

What would you like to do after residency?
I am planning to pursue Fellowship! Working out the details, PEM or NICU are my top runners :)

When I'm not in the hospital you can find me... 
Doing yoga, hiking, golfing, reading FOR FUN, playing tennis, running, eating out, exploring LA, traveling, hanging with friends, co-residents, and family.

Huan Dong

Huan Dong, MD

What made you want to train at UCLA? 
I wanted to train at UCLA because when I was a medical student in the Drew/DGSOM program, I saw how the residents and attendings nourished an environment of learning and support. I thought this created very confident senior residents as well as competent medical students. I always felt I was given opportunities to participate in patient care and procedures, as well as via hands on simulations and mock codes. I knew UCLA would be a great learning environment for me to thrive clinically as well as academically. I never felt that I was belittled for not knowing something, yet often I was encouraged to further explore specific topics and provided resources to help in my learning.

This open environment also includes leadership dedicated to discussions on diversity, equity, and inclusion as well as being champions in LGBTQ+ health. This is a place that is open to many different communities, thus a place that encourages me to continue to champion those values throughout my training and beyond.

What part of your training has been the most meaningful, so far?
The most meaningful part of training has been meeting all of our colleagues across our many clinical sites who all had their own experiences and styles to interact with their specific populations. I not only learn from attendings but from the fellows and other residents, who brought so much experience from their previous training sites and were happy to share resources for learning. I love that I am surrounded by residents who are also committed to health equity and justice in our Resident Diversity Committee and our Advocacy Council. At our four major medical centers and all the other outpatient clinics we rotate through, I feel as though I have a chance to interact and learn about so many different communities in Southern California, each with their own uniqueness as well as challenges. Interacting with many different patients and their families has helped me learn to empathize by listening to their stories, and helping them use their strengths to motivate health and wellbeing. 

What projects are you working on?
My special interests include: Global Health, LGBTQ+ health, Infectious disease (STIs/HIV) and antimicrobial resistance

What are your plans after residency?
Likely an ID fellowship, but these cute babies in the NICU are also calling out to me... 

When I’m not in the hospital you can find me…
Cooking fabulous meals with my partner, Kevin. Bouldering with my co-residents Grace, Prerana, and John. Mentoring medical students / undergrads. Tending to my herb garden. Hiking around LA. Dancing around my apartment "on my own". 

Vivian Lin

Vivian Lin, MD

Why did you want to train at UCLA?
I immigrated to US for undergraduate studies at UCLA. Although I "left" for medical school at Loma Linda Medical School, I always wanted to come back to UCLA for pediatric residency. I love the city, the weather, and most importantly my residency family.

What part of training has been the most meaningful, so far?
Learning from different people - faculty, residents, medical students, and patients.

What projects are you working on? Or what special interests do you have?
I'm currently work with a group of people to improve discharge process for our Spanish-speaking families.

What would you like to do after residency?
I'm pursuing a fellowship in Pediatric Hospital Medicine and hope to complete a degree in education.

When I'm not in the hospital you can find me...
On my weekends, you can find me lounging on Janns Steps or on the grass in Switzer Plaza.

Stephanie Byrne

Stephanie Byrne, MD

Why did you want to train at UCLA?
UCLA was my TOP choice for residency for just about every reason. Having been born and raised in Southern California, I was acutely aware of my desire to be in a beautiful, warm, year-round outdoor activity area during residency. Time off is precious, and Los Angeles offers easy access to just about everything...beaches, mountains, deserts, you name it! I also wanted to be close to my family during what would surely be a trying three years...can't beat the occasional home cooked meal! But what really drew me to UCLA, first as a visiting Sub-I on PICU and later as an applicant on the interview trail, was the people. My husband and I couples matched for residency, and in doing so, literally traveled all over the country interviewing for residency. Hands down, UCLA had the happiest, friendliest, and most welcoming residents, faculty and staff. I immediately felt welcomed as a rotator, and LOVED my sub-internship, despite being on one of the most demanding services in the hospital. The attendings and residents fostered a positive, encouraging environment in which I felt comfortable presenting and proposing treatment plans. Lastly, everyone at UCLA has an amazing life outside of medicine, and is just AWESOME!!

What part of training has been the most meaningful, so far?
The most meaningful part of training thus far has, without a doubt, been my interactions with our incredibly diverse patient population. Both in the hospital and in the outpatient setting, we have patients who come to us over and over again because they have great trust and affection for our faculty and staff. It is an amazing privilege to be a part of our patients' lives, and makes even the hardest day a good one.

What projects are you working on? Or what special interests do you have?
I came into residency knowing that my heart belonged to outpatient primary care. I love getting to know families on a more personal level, and am excited to watch children grow and flourish over time. I also have a particular interest in preventative medicine, especially in regards to nutrition and obesity prevention. Currently, I am looking to start a QI project that could be implemented in the outpatient setting.

What would you like to do after residency?
After residency, I would love to join either an academic or private primary care group here in Los Angeles. Although I grew up in the suburbs, Los Angeles has become my home.

When I'm not in the hospital you can find me...
When I'm not in the hospital, you can find me at the barn!! I am an avid equestrian, and have been riding horses for over 20 years. I usually am able to carve out time to ride at least once a week, and it is my happy place!! I also enjoy cuddling kitties, dogs, pigs, hiking, and eating at any one of LA's many amazing restaurants!!

Adrianna Stanley

Adrianna Stanley, MD (MedPeds)

Why did you want to train at UCLA?
I loved both the breadth and depth of clinical training at UCLA. With our multiple training sites, we are able to care for a diverse community of patients. I also loved that we are able to tailor our training to fit our interests: advocacy, gender health, global health, medical education, just to name a few!

What part of training has been the most meaningful, so far?
As a Latina in medicine, it has meant so much to be able to give back to my community. From speaking Spanish with my patients to supporting UCLA's under-represented medical students and residents, I have been able to witness our community grow and thrive under the opportunities UCLA has provided.

What projects are you working on? Or what special interests do you have?
As an Internal Medicine - Pediatrics resident, I have been involved in the Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) space within both departments. Most recently, I am working on mentorship programs with UCLA medical students and community building initiatives across all specialties at UCLA. I also serve on the National Med-Peds Resident Association Executive Board, where I aim to bright light to EDI efforts across all med-peds programs nationwide. My academic interests include Health Equity, Global Health, and Neglected Tropical Diseases.

What would you like to do after residency?
I am hoping to pursue infectious disease fellowship or join the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) with a future career in global health at the CDC or WHO.

When I'm not in the hospital you can find me...
eating tacos in DTLA! I love exploring LA's food scene - especially rooftop restaurants and food trucks!